Team-Building Activities and Games
Fun team building games from the books
Team-Building Activities for Every Group
and
More Team-Building Activities for Every Group
 can be found on this page!
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Team-Building Activities for Every Group
Bid and Build
 
Objective
To work together as a team to build a bridge out of the objects your team obtains.
 
Group Size
4 to 20 participants is ideal
 
Materials
A large sheet of paper (or chalkboard, dry erase board, etc.)
A writing utensil for the paper, chalkboard, or dry erase board
Various items that can be used or not used to get a group from point A to point B (i.e. Frisbees®, sheets of paper, rope, hula hoops, pieces of wood or cardboard, an old garbage can, a tumbling mat, or anything else you can find)
Paper
Pens or pencils
Optional: Play money
 
Description
    This activity is two teamwork activities in one! For the first part, list all the items that you have gathered on the large sheet of paper, display it for the group to see, and show them the items listed. Divide the group into at least two smaller teams of two or more and give each group a piece of paper and a pen or pencil. Explain to the groups that their task is to attempt to get their entire team from one side of an open area to the other side (at least ten yards apart) using any of the items listed and without anyone on their team touching the ground at any time.
    First the teams must bid for the items listed. Each team gets 100 points (or $100 in play money) that they may spend however they wish on the items. They must divide up the points based on what they think will help them the most and write down their bids on the paper given to them. For example, one team may bid 75 points on the Frisbees, and 25 points on the rope. Another team may bid 50 points on the rope, 25 points on the Frisbees, 10 on the paper, and 15 on the cardboard.
    After all the bids are completed, collect them and divide up the materials based upon the highest bid. In the example, the first team would end up with the Frisbees and nothing else, but the second team would get the rope, paper, and cardboard. If there is a tie for any item, you may have the teams bid again on certain items or divide the items up if possible.
    Once the teams have their items, the second part of this teamwork activity occurs. They must now work together to get their entire team across the open area without any of the team members touching the ground in the process.
 
Discussion Prompts
1. Was it hard for your team to agree on what numbers to bid? Why or why not?
2. What did you do to come to an agreement?
3. When you disagree with others how do you handle it?
4. How do you feel about your ability to work with others after this activity?
5. What role do you usually take when in a group that is making decisions? Do you feel this is a good role for you? Why?
 
Variation
This activity may be done for an art project as well. Teams must bid on items that can be used to create a piece of art.
 
(From the book Team-Building Activities for Every Group)


Piggyback Challenge
 
 
Objective
To build trust and communication skills.
Group Size
2 or more
 
Materials
None
 
Description
    Ask the group to get into pairs and for half the pairs to stand on one half of the room and for the rest to stand facing them on the other half. Each pair needs to select one person to ride piggyback on the back of his/her partner. The person who is carrying the other person closes his/her eyes. One the signal "go" the person on the back must verbally tell his/her partner how to safely get to the other side of the room without bumping into anyone who is coming in the other direction or who is on either side of them.
     To make this activity more challenging you may place some other obstacles in the area that must be maneuvered around.
 
Discussion Prompts
1. If you were the one with your eyes closed, did you ever open them? Why or why not?
2. Did you trust your partner?
3. If you were the one being carried, did you trust your partner?
4. Why is trust important when working as a part of a team?
5.   Are you trustworthy? Why or why not?
 
(From the book Team-Building Activities for Every Group)


Earthquake Escape
 
Objective
To build trust and to learn to work together in a situation in which people's abilities and needs are different.
 
Group Size
6 to 10 participants (or break large groups into small groups of 6 to 10 each)
 
Materials
Cardboard
Small flat wood pieces
Cloth strips
Cotton balls
 
Description
    Explain to the group that there has just been a major earthquake and that many of the group members have sustained injuries. Select different group members to have different injuries and instruct them to act out these injuries during the course of the activity. One person may be deaf with cotton balls in his/her ears, another person is blind with a blindfold on. Someone may be unconscious and must lie on the ground. Others may have broken legs or arms with splints made out of cloth strips and cardboard or wood pieces, or you may tie someone's arms to his/her side. You may or may not appoint one or more people to have no injuries.
    Once each person is set up with his/her injuries, tell the group you just got word that we are expecting aftershocks and they are in a dangerous area and must move to safety. Designate an area that has been declared safe at least twenty yards away. Prior to the activity, set up obstacles such as tables, overturned chairs, and other objects between the danger zone and the "safe area". The group must move everyone to the safety area without causing any further injury.
 
Discussion Prompts
1. How did you feel when helping others get to safety?
2. How did you feel if others had to help you?
3. Do you have any disabilities that require you to accept help from others? If so, how do you deal with this?
4. How do you react to someone else who is working with you who has a disability that requires your help?
 
(From the book Team-Building Activities for Every Group)


Lifeline
 
Objective
For a group of people to work together to problem-solve and to be resourceful when given a challenging task.
 
Group Size
5 or more
 
Materials
None
 
Description
    Create an area that is to be a "fast-moving river" by marking off an area on the ground at least twenty feet across (make it a bigger distance for larger groups). Ask for one or two volunteers from the group to go to the other side of the "river," Once the team members are across the river, tell the rest of the group that their friends have become stranded on the far side of the river after their boat tipped over, and the group must create a lifeline so that they can pull their comrades to safety.
    The group must make a chain of items that are tied together out of anything they can find (clothes, shoelaces, tree branches, etc.). Once the group makes a chain, they must be able to hold onto one end and throw the other end to their stranded teammates. The lifeline must make it all the way to the other side when thrown. If it goes into the river it must be reeled in and thrown again.
     Once the lifeline reaches the other side, the teammates may be pulled to safety one at a time.
 
Discussion Prompts
1. Did everyone contribute to the lifeline? Why or why not?
2. Could one person have made the lifeline? Why or why not?
3. Would you want to be across a real river and be depending on this group to throw you a lifeline? Why or why not?
4. If this was a real river, how would trust be a factor?
 
(From the book Team-Building Activities for Every Group)
 
 


Hula Walk
Objective
To promote teamwork and cooperation.
 
Group Size
3 or more
 
Materials
Several Hula-Hoops
 
Description
    Line group members up side by side, give them Hula-Hoops and have them connect themselves in the following manner: One person puts his/her right leg inside a Hula-Hoop. The person next to them puts their left leg inside the same hoop, pulling the hoop taut so that it isn't dragging on the ground. That person then puts his/her right leg into another hoop, and so on, until the entire line of people is connected by Hula-Hoops. Those on the ends will have their outside leg free. Once everyone is connected the group must try to walk across a designated area without letting the hoops fall. This can also be done with two rows of people, one in the back and one in the front, all connected using the same hoops. Have smaller groups take turns if there aren't very many hoops.
Discussion Prompts
1. Was this easy or difficult for the group? Why?
2. What obstacles did you encounter while doing this activity?
3. Is it easier for you to overcome obstacles on your own or when with a group? Why?
 
Variation
Use string or elastic bands instead of hoops.
 
(From the book More Team-Building Activities for Every Group)


Road Map
Objective
For group members to work together to plan an event.
Group Size
4 or more
Materials
One map for each team
Paper
Pens or pencils
 
Description
    Divide the group into teams of two to eight and give each group a map. The map can be of the state you live in, of the whole country, or of a specific area, but give each group a copy of the same map. Instruct the teams to plan a vacation, working within the parameters you set for them. Give each group a list of what they have for their trip, how much money, what kind of car, size of gas tank, mpg, price of gas, start or end destination, size of town they can find gas in, amount of time they have, and anything else you think of. Also, give each group paper and a pen or pencil for writing down their travel plans. Any group that runs out of money or gas will be disqualified. You may give "awards" to the team that saw and did the most with what they had, or for the most exhausting trip, the most relaxing, etc.
Discussion Prompts
1. Was this a fun task for your group? Why or why not?
2. Did everyone give the same amount of input?
3. Were any of your ideas rejected? If so, how did you feel? Did you stop giving ideas?
4. What is the hardest part about group decision making?
5. Would you want to go on the trip you planned?
6. Would you want to go on a trip that another group planned?
7. Are vacations usually fun or stressful for you? Why?
 
(From the book More Team-Building Activities for Every Group)


Lego® Tall Tower
Objective
For each team to work together on a common project.
 
Group Size
4 or more
Materials
Lego® type building blocks
Description
    Prior to the activity, hide Lego® pieces around the room or simply scatter them about. Divide the group into teams of four or more and challenge the groups to build as tall a tower as they can out of the Lego® building blocks. On the "go" signal team members must try to find and gather as many Legos® as they can and then put them together. The winning team is the one with the tallest tower after a given time limit (or after each team has completed the task). Some teams will end up with fewer Legos® than the other teams and will have to be more creative to make their building tall. You may give different awards to each team at the end (i.e., tallest tower with fewest bricks, fastest gatherers, fastest builders, etc.).
 
Discussion Prompts
1. Was your team very competitive during this game?
2. How did the competition effect the performance of your team? What if there had been no competition and you simply had to build a tall tower out of Legos® you were given?
3. Do you feel competition when on different teams?
4. How do you deal with this competition?
 
(From the book More Team-Building Activities for Every Group)


Blind Money
 
Objective
For group members to learn to trust each other.
 
Group Size
4 or more
Materials
2 quarters for each two people
A bucket, box or garbage can
Masking tape
Description
    Place a large bucket, box, or garbage can in the center of a circle that has been marked off with tape and have participants get into pairs. Give each pair two quarters and have them stand on the outside of the circle. One person must tip their head back and place one quarter over each of their eyes. Their partner then verbally directs them as they try to walk toward the bucket in the center of the circle and drop their money into it. If they drop their money before getting to the bucket or don't make it into the bucket, they must pick the money up, go back to the edge of the circle, and start over. Do at least two rounds of this game, giving each person the chance to be in both roles.
Discussion Prompts
1. Did you trust your partner? Why or why not?
2. Was it harder to give directions or to receive them? Why?
3. Why are communication and trust both important parts of any partnership?
4. How well do you communicate and how much are you trusted? Are these two elements related?
5. Are you ever "blinded" by money? How?
 
(From the book More Team-Building Activities for Every Group)


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